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Vertigo & Motion Sickness Support

Vertigo is a sensation of spinning when one is stationary. It comes from the Latin root word verto "a whirling or spinning movement". Vertigo is like dizziness in which a person experiences the perception of motion (usually a spinning motion) due to dysfunction of the vestibular system that controls balance.

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Vertigo / Motion Sickness (Dizziness) Info

“Vertigo is the conflict between the fear of falling and the desire to fall.”

Salman Rushdie

 

Vertigo is a sensation of spinning when one is stationary. It comes from the Latin root word verto "a whirling or spinning movement". Vertigo is like dizziness in which a person experiences the perception of motion (usually a spinning motion) due to dysfunction of the vestibular system that controls balance.

Dizziness and light-headedness are often accompanied by involuntary eye movements or flutters (called 'nystagmus'.) During a single episode of vertigo, this action will occur repeatedly. Closing ones eyes and sitting still can help make the symptoms fade.

Low blood pressure is a common cause of vertigo – can be transient hypotension or part of a more serious condition.  It can also be associated with epileptic seizures.

Vertigo often associated with nausea and vomiting as well as a balance disorder, causing difficulties standing or walking. Sometime the root cause can be a middle ear infection or Ménière's disease, so a healthcare practitioner should be consulted.

Vertigo is indicated by symptoms that last for longer than one day and are caused by age-related degenerative changes that affect balance. Nerve conduction slows with age and a decreased vibratory sensation is common. Unfortunately, getting older results in the degeneration of the organs that control balance (the ampulla and otolith organs) - so vertigo is a natural phenomenon, whose likelihood increases with age.

Persistent onset is often paired with central vertigo signs and systems. There are natural therapies available that may benefit vertigo. Positive effects have been found in studies investigating vitamin B6 on drug-induced vertigo and nausea, results suggested that vitamin B6 appears to offer protection against this form of vertigo. Ginger, gingko biloba and Co-enzyme Q10 have all been shown to confer benefits in reducing the severity of symptoms in vertigo. The calming effect of these supplements on the gastrointestinal system appear to be the reasoning behind the benefit.

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