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Memory Loss

Memory loss or amnesia (from Greek meaning "without memory”) is characterised by a loss of memory. It is usually associated with brain damage, disease, or other psychological trauma. Amnesia can also be caused by the use of sedatives and certain hypnotic drugs. Essentially, amnesia is loss of memory. The memory can be either wholly or partially lost due to the extent of damage that was caused.

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Memory Loss Info

“Memory... is the diary that we all carry about with us.”

Oscar Wilde

Or not. Memory loss or amnesia (from Greek meaning "without memory”) is characterised by a loss of memory. It is usually associated with brain damage, disease, or other psychological trauma. Amnesia can also be caused by the use of sedatives and certain hypnotic drugs. Essentially, amnesia is loss of memory. The memory can be either wholly or partially lost due to the extent of damage that was caused.

There are two main types of amnesia: retrograde amnesia and anterograde amnesia. Retrograde amnesia is the inability to retrieve information that was acquired before a particular date, usually the date of an accident or an operation. In some cases, the memory loss can extend back decades, while in others the person may lose only a few months of memory. Anterograde amnesia is the inability to transfer new information from the short-term store into the long-term store. People with this type of amnesia cannot remember things for long periods of time. These two types are not mutually exclusive. Both can occur within a patient at one time.

In people suffering amnesia, the ability to recall recent immediate information is still retained, and they may still be able to form new memories - yet, a severe reduction in the ability to learn new material and retrieve old information can be observed. Patients can learn new procedural knowledge. In addition, priming (both perceptual and conceptual) can assist amnesiacs in the learning of fresh non-declarative knowledge. People with amnesia can retain substantial intellectual, linguistic, and social skill despite these profound impairments in the ability to recall specific information encountered in prior learning episodes.

It is important that a health professional is consulted. There are natural remedies that may benefit amnesia.

Particularly supplementing with choline and phosphatidylserine may confer some benefits. These two molecules are lipid components that support structure and function of neurons that are involved in memory acquisition and recall. Choline plays an important role in the neuronal processes underlying memory via two different mechanisms. It serves both as a precursor for the important neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which is important for neuronal signalling involved in memory, and also for phosphatidylcholine. It is believed that reduced levels of phosphatidylcholine in neurons may contribute to memory loss and other forms of cognitive decline - so supplementation with both choline and phosphatidylserine may confer some benefits or at least reduce symptoms of memory loss.

Product Reviews

  • Excellent!

    Very good indeed! It really helps me at work, I'm much more alert & I learn faster & easier. Very impressed!

    Debbie

    10/07/16

  • Excellent product

    I have tried many GB products over the years, and always came back to this one- it works. I was a Fisheries scientist and delivered many presentations assisted by the mental acuity provided by this wee capsule. These days I'm a Science secondary teacher and only take it during the school week; to stay ahead of my capable senior students!

    Ben

    1/05/16

  • Great for the mind but not so good side effects

    I started taking the full dose of this product but it made me nauseous so I decided to just take half and that worked well. I feel it works well for the mind which is why I started taking it. But the only down side which is why I have now stopped taking it is that I noticed I was getting cyst like pimples. So I will just see if this subsides after not taking it to see if it is the fish oil. And I have to add the taste gets to you after a while! Better to mix with some juice!

    Pip

    22/04/16

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